ERC in the News

  • March 19, 2014
    SEC Whistleblower Advocate

    Last month, the Ethics Resource Center (ERC) released its biennial National Business Ethics Survey (NBES). I was honored to serve on the NBES Advisory Panel this year, particularly given its reputation as a definitive barometer of workplace ethics. As we’ve seen in prior years, the survey shows some very positive trends as well as causes for real concern and further attention.

    Read complete article.

  • March 13, 2014
    Investors.com

    Ethical misconduct is in decline, according to a new study. That's progress. But business leaders still have plenty of work to do, with managers committing many of the misdeeds and people who report problems still facing retaliation.

    Those are among the findings of the Ethics Resource Center's latest National Business Ethics Survey.

    Read complete article.

  • February 25, 2014
    The Christian Science Monitor

    Observed misconduct in American workplaces is at its lowest point in almost two decades, an achievement that appears to be related to companies’ increasing investment in ethics and compliance initiatives.

  • February 20, 2014
    Associations Now

    New findings from the Ethics Resource Center suggest that overall workplace misconduct is on the decline, while other findings suggest there is room for improvement. Here are some tips for toning up your association’s ethical culture.

    Good news for employees and employers in the United States. Workplace misconduct is at a historic low, according to the Ethics Resource Center.

    Read complete article.

  • February 19, 2014
    HRE Online

    The good news coming from a recent Ethics Resource Center study? Corporate misconduct seems to be on the wane, overall.

    The not-so-good news? A majority of the misdeeds that are occurring in the workplace are committed by those the organization counts on to set an example for employees to follow.

    Read complete article.

  • February 10, 2014
    Bloomberg BNA

    Workplace misconduct is on the decline, according to a survey released Feb. 4 by the Ethics Resource Center, which found that 41 percent of employees observed misconduct in 2013, down from 55 percent in 2007.

    Moreover, the eighth “National Business Ethics Survey,” which polled 6,400 U.S. employees, found that only 9 percent of employees felt pressure to compromise their standards in 2013, down from 13 percent in the previous survey in 2011.

    Read complete article.

  • February 8, 2014
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

    Stealing office supplies? Bullying a workplace underling? Bribing the Bahrainan royal family? You're not alone -- but then again, the company you keep is shrinking.

    Workplace misconduct seems to be on the downswing, according to a new survey from the Ethics Resource Center, an Arlington, Va.-based research nonprofit. In a biannual report issued Tuesday, the center said only 41 percent of the 6,400 employees surveyed have observed misconduct at work.

  • February 6, 2014
    Washington Post

    The headlines may be filled with news about business scandals, from charges of insider trading at SAC Capital to the alleged Libor rate-rigging manipulation involving major banks. Yet workplace misconduct is actually at a historic low, according to a newly released survey from the Ethics Resource Center, a research nonprofit focused on ethical standards at both public and private organizations.

  • February 5, 2014
    Business News Daily

    Employees are doing a much better job of staying out of trouble, a new study finds.

    Research from the Ethics Resource Center (ERC), revealed that workplace misconduct has reached an historic low, having steadily and significantly declined since 2007. Specifically, 41 percent of employees have observed misconduct on the job, down from 55 percent in 2007.

    Read complete article.

  • February 4, 2014
    Compliance Week

    Workplace misconduct is at an historic low, having steadily and significantly declined since 2007. That's the encouraging news from a new survey released by the Ethics Resource Center.

    The center's National Business Ethics Survey, conducted every two years, found that 41 percent of more than 6,400 workers surveyed said they have observed misconduct on the job, down from 55 percent in 2007. The report also found that fewer employees felt pressure to compromise their standards, down to nine percent from 13 percent in 2011.